Daniel Kerr Posts

St Kilda and Fremantle: The Bizarro Rivalry (update)

The Ross Lyon defection brokered a new sensational chapter in the ridiculous rivalry between St Kilda and Fremantle, which I’d written on in 2010.

Whilst Ross took things to a new level, this past weekend threw up a couple more very interesting links:
– St Kilda’s first Grand Final appearance was in 1913, against Fitzroy. Freo will make their first Grand Final appearance 100 years later.
– Freo’s strange decision to wear their clash jumper on Saturday makes them just the second club to do so in a Grand Final. The first team to wear a clash jumper in Grand Final was St Kilda – also under Ross – in 2010.

Here’s the original post, “St Kilda and Fremantle: The Bizarre Rivalry” (I’m not sure why I didn’t take the golden opportunity to throw in the Seinfeld reference then and there) from 2010:

St Kilda and Fremantle share one of the most bizarre “rivalries” in the AFL.

As the two least successful clubs in VFL/AFL history to date, it’s not all-important clashes between competition juggernauts that this rivalry has been based on.

Rather, it has been a mixture of the unique, incredible and questionable, with occasional flashes of both genuinely brilliant and sadly woeful football being played.

It began immediately – although inconspicuously – in 1995, when Fremantle played their debut AFL match in the Ansett Australia Cup against the Saints at East Fremantle Oval. Whilst the match itself was normal enough (St Kilda would win by 35 points), this would be the only time (to date) the Dockers would actually play in Fremantle in a competitive AFL match.

In Round 14 of the following season, St Kilda would break through for its first win at Subiaco, and in Western Australia – of course, against Fremantle – in a game which produced great goals from both sides.

The next clash between the two came on ANZAC Day of 1997, with Fremantle – in 10th place and the Saints in 16th – weathering a late St Kilda challenge to win by a straight kick. The return bout was played on a ridiculously blustery day at Waverley in Round 20 of that year, with Fremantle in 10th place (again) going into the match whilst St Kilda was second on percentage, on its way to a second minor premiership. The Saints that time won a scrappy game by 13 points after the Dockers got within a point in the final term.

St Kilda co-captain Stewart Loewe would be stretchered off in Round 9 of 1998 at the WACA after an awkward fall in which his head ended up making contact with his knee. Despite a thrilling running goal from ruckman Peter Everitt, the 4th-placed Saints were overrun by the 13th-placed Dockers in the final term.

After several years of minor quirks, things were about to get really weird.

Continue readingRound 15 of 1999 will be remembered for the mark that was taken by umpire Peter Carey. Early in the match, Docker (and former Saint) Adrian Fletcher centred a short pass to Brad Wira on the wing, only for the experienced Carey, who was in the path of the ball’s trajectory, to take the mark and call for a ball-up. Needless to say, the incident was a massive talking point in football circles, though ultimately it would take its place in VFL/AFL history as a wonderfully unique and humourous moment in a game that has a habit of throwing those up from time to time. The Dockers would go on to win the game by 23 points, and send St Kilda’s season into a further downward spiral.

By the time the two teams met in Round 12 of 2001, both teams had new coaches and were sharing 14th (St Kilda) and 16th (Fremantle) places on the ladder; by season’s end they would be 15th and 16th respectively. On this Saturday night at Subiaco, the Saints won their third game of the year after a young Stephen Milne sprang to life in the final term, on his way to kicking three goals and giving the Saints a 10-point win. However, captain Robert Harvey would seriously injure his knee in a gang tackle that continued well past its use-by date; with the ball locked up amongst the scrum, the umpire inexplicably chose to let play continue, long enough for the Dockers players to force Harvey to the turf as his knee buckled under him.

It would also be Malcolm Blight’s last victory as coach for the Saints, with his brief tenure at Moorabbin ending just three weeks later.

The next season threw up a couple more notable matches – in Round 2, the fast-finishing Dockers would roll the Saints by three points at home after trailing for much of the day, and in Round 17 St Kilda played a rare home match at Princes Park and defeat the Dockers in a dead-rubber in front of just 8,078 fans.

A skip to 2004 would find Brent Guerra breaking Docker Byran Schammer’s arm in a devastating bump as a barnstorming St Kilda extended their winning streak to seven to begin the season, as well as Fremantle wearing their predominantly white away/clash jumper for the first time in the return match in Round 22 at Docklands.

A trio of thrilling matches followed. Strange, thrilling matches.

In round 2 of 2005, St Kilda won their first match of the season by a solitary point at York Park in Tasmania. The Saints would overhaul the Dockers in trying conditions, with Aaron Hamill earning a free kick for holding the ball and scoring the winning point – but not before a final Fremantle charge into their forward line, with defender Luke Penny expertly safely punching the ball out of bounds in the final seconds from a marking contest.

The infamous “Whispers in the Sky” clash was a dire battle in Round 21 at Subiaco. St Kilda were pushing to solidify a top four spot after being outside of the 8 after Round 13, though tipped by many to win the premiership on the eve of the season. Skipper Nick Riewoldt has broken his collarbone in Round 14, and stand-in captain Justin Koschitzke had powered his way to stunning form and lead the Saints’ fight for redemption. He earned 11 Brownlow votes in just five matches, and with Riewoldt back, he was seen as a key component to St Kilda’s premiership hopes as September neared. Fremantle, meanwhile were hoping to return to finals action after St Kilda had knocked them out on the eve of the 2004 finals series.

What happened on that Friday night is now a part of St Kilda-Fremantle rivalry folklore. Awful and questionable umpiring decisions went Fremantle’s way all night, gifting the Dockers several goals and depriving the Saints of several chances of their own. Koschitzke would injure a quad muscle in the third quarter, and he would not be fit enough to return to the side, which bowed out in the preliminary final several weeks later (had St Kilda defeated Sydney in that match, he would have been a huge chance to return for the Grand Final).

The final term was an old-fashioned thriller. In the final minute, with the Saints up by a point, Justin Peckett was run down by Luke McPharlin just outside Fremantle’s 50-metre arc; the resulting kick forward saw Justin Longmuir take a spectacular mark over the top of the pack just 25 metres out from goal. His kick was straight, and the Dockers had won by five points, and were to face reigning premier Port Adelaide the following week in the final round for a spot in the finals.

Channel Nine reporter Tony Jones – travelling back to Melbourne from the game after Nine’s coverage – claimed that he heard umpire Matthew Head, who had made a number of the decisions that went Fremantle’s way remark, “Now I know what it feels like to have a victory”. Several other passengers made the same claim as Jones, but the AFL cleared Head of any wrongdoing after an investigation into the matter that week.

Though they would start strongly, Fremantle lost to Port Adelaide the following week and finish 10th as the Power clinched eighth spot. St Kilda would go on to record two amazing victories over the following two weeks – their biggest win in the club’s 132-year history over the Brisbane Lions, by 139 points, and a brave eight-point win over minor premiers Adelaide in the First Qualifying Final at AAMI Stadium, to secure a home Preliminary Final and a week’s rest.

But the centrepiece of this rivalry – so far, at least – came in Round 5, 2006; the final installment of this trilogy taking place where it started – at York Park (now Aurora Stadium) in Tasmania, referred to as “Sirengate”.

The Dockers were truly dangerous in 2006, and were only knocked out a week short of the Grand Final. Though notorious for poor interstate form, on this day they were all over an inept St Kilda, who were making another slow start to a season. Though the Saints would be in with a chance all day, that chance seemed to have disappeared as the clock counted down to zero as a desperate Dockers defence forced a stopped in the Saints forward line, with their team up by a point. The siren sounded, and Fremantle players around the ball began celebrating a hard-fought victory.

But the siren was quite faint, and umpire didn’t hear it – and play continued from the stoppage well after full-time. The Saints forced the ball to Steven Baker, whose flying shot at goal – a number of seconds after the siren – missed to the left, tying the scores. The umpire then awarded Baker a free kick for a hit he got as he kicked it, and so he was to take the kick again, with the first behind taken back, and the Saints again down by a point. As this was occurring, Fremantle officials had stormed on to the ground to remonstrate with the umpires, with coach Chris Connolly finding himself arguing with St Kilda player Lenny Hayes. Verbal stoushes were springing up between officials, umpires and players left, right and centre, and amongst it all, Baker missed again. The game was a draw.

St Kilda coach Grant Thomas declared the game “one for the blooper reel” in the post-match wash-up, whilst Connolly was understandably furious. Fremantle immediately took the issue to the AFL. Sensationally, the AFL overturned the result during the week, with final score officially at 13.15 (93) to 14.10 (94), the Dockers victorious by a point.

The sides would meet again at Subiaco in Round 20. To date, this match is the most important game the clubs have been involved in against each other, with a top four spot up for grabs. Fremantle trounced the Saints, with the only highlight for St Kilda being a goal kicked by Brendon Goddard from an enormous kick late in the match; from just inside the centre square, Goddard’s kick would go through the goals at post-height.

The Dockers would finish third on the ladder, with fellow Subiaco tenants West Coast in first place. Though they would lose the Second Qualifying Final to Adelaide away, they won their first final of any sort at home against Melbourne a week later. Sydney knocked them out a week later, otherwise the MCG would have been set for an all-Western Australian Grand Final.

Several things of note come out of this. Firstly, St Kilda would have finished third on superior percentage if the “Sirengate” result had stood, forcing eventual Grand Finalists Sydney out of the top four, and forcing a Western Derby as a First Qualifying Final. Instead, the Saints finished sixth and limped out of the finals series in the first week, losing to Melbourne in the Second Elimination Final. Of course, if the Saints had won that game – which was a good chance of happening through the final term – they would have faced Fremantle in a semi-final, bringing the two teams face-to-face in massive game; as it happened, Grant Thomas would be sacked just days after the loss to the Demons. The other point worth considering – albeit a hypothetical one – is if the AFL would have overturned the result the way it did had Baker actually kicked a goal from either of his shots, “winning” the game for St Kilda. It’s one thing to overturn a draw, but to  completely reverse the outcome of a match would have made this issue far, far greater, and a much more daunting prospect for the AFL.

The following season was a disappointment for both teams. When they squared off in Round 20, with the Saints hoping to snatch a finals spot under new coach Ross Lyon, a collision between Steven Baker and Jeff Farmer would be the talking point of the competition for the following week.

Farmer left the ground concussed, with blood pouring from his face, after evidently running into the back of Baker. No umpires nor cameras saw or captured the incident, but a Fremantle trainer said that Baker had been malicious in the collision, and this was influential in the seven-match suspension Baker received. The Saints appealed, but this fell on deaf ears from the AFL. The decision would prove costly for the Saints, who were now without their star tagger as they were coming up against West Coast the following week, a must-win game for the Saints. The Eagles’ midfield of Chris Judd, Ben Cousins and Daniel Kerr were able to run far more freely and eventually the Eagles would win by eight points; though St Kilda defeated Richmond in Round 22, they would finish the season in ninth position after Adelaide also won their final round match to knock St Kilda out of September calculations.

Round 13 of 2008 saw a spluttering Saints wielding the axe on senior players Nick Dal Santo and Stephen Milne after just three wins from the previous ten games of football. Ben McEvoy, Robert Eddy and Jarryd Allen would all debut for the Saints on a dogged Friday night, with the Saints prevailing by eight points. It would be the beginning of a remarkable turnaround for Ross Lyon and his men, who would win eight of their final ten matches in the home-and-away season to finish fourth, including the return game at Subiaco in Round 20 which Stephen Milne played out with a grotesquely swollen cheek. The Saints would fall one week short of the Grand Final.

The Saints would go one better in 2009, as Fremantle were again finding themselves at the wrong end of the ladder. In Round 4, the Saints crushed the Dockers by 88 points, and keeping the visitors to a scoreline of 4.4 (28), the joint-lowest score at Docklands. Of course, that record is shared with St Kilda, who could only manage 3.10 (28) against Collingwood in Round 6 of 2002.

Most recently, their 2010 NAB Cup semi-final match was nearly called off, after storms ravaged the Melbourne CBD, leaving Etihad Stadium with internal roofing damage. The players ran out for a later start to no crowd in attendance, and the 5,000+ fans were eventually let in over the first quarter, but only allowed to be seated on the bottom level. St Kilda would win a position in the Final easily, but would lose that to the Western Bulldogs, who were making their first Final appearance of any kind in 40 years.

And now on Sunday evening, the two teams will be squaring off, and coming into this round are occupying the top two positions on the ladder. It’s definitely the first time this has happened with these two clubs; Fremantle will be looking to be on top of the AFL ladder at the completion of any round for the first time in their history, whilst the Saints are going to be entering a lengthy period of time with injured captain Nick Riewoldt. The football world will be watching this intriguing clash, which will hopefully be remembered for some good football, promising individual performances and solid teamwork. As long as no umpires take marks or feel like “having a victory”, or the siren fails, or there are unseen and inconclusive clashes which result in massive suspensions, or storms unleash fury over Melbourne, then there’s a good chance that just might happen.

But who knows?

Links

Umpire Peter Carey takes a mark in Round 15, 1999

Justin Longmuir kicks a goal after the siren to win the game for the Dockers in the “Whispers in the Sky” match, in Round 20, 2005

“Sirengate” finish Part 1, Round 5, 2006

“Sirengate” finish Part 2

Brendon Goddard’s monster goal, Round 20, 2006

Shadow of a doubt

Never has the football maxim “a week is a long time in football” rung truer in my ears.

‘Tis three nights after the Saints unexpectedly, and stylishly, toppled the much-fancied Carlton, and the football media is still giddy with the heights that the side reached and has thus anointed them as contenders in 2012. The term ‘flavour of the month’, has surely been replaced by ‘flavour of the week’?

Granted, it was one of the side’s most satisfying victories in recent times, despite playing in countless significant battles over the last three or four seasons. The victory was sparked by some of the sides newest faces, and gave the fans a glimpse into the full potential of how well some of these players could play in the new setup that Scott Watters has implemented.

But that was it.

A glance at the current ladder will show you the logjam that fills up the majority of it. Two wins separate first and tenth – who are last years premiers, by the way – with the Saints in the thick of it, sitting in eighth. They return to the ledger should they succumb to a strengthened West Coast outfit on Sunday, with the Swans up next in round nine.

Monday night’s exciting performance was a glimpse; but contenders are not born on glimpses. “We are what we repeatedly do” is what Aristotle once muttered, and it still applies.

So before we all start getting Milera printed on our foreheads, calling our babies Ahmed, or getting Rhys Stanley’s haircut, let’s take a deep breath and take in the task that lay ahead for these new kids on the block.

(more…)

A dedication

Round 17, 2011
St Kilda 6.1,  8.4,  8.4,  13.4 (82)
West Coast Eagles 0.1,  4.2,  8.6,  9.7 (61)
Crowd: 31,416 at Etihad Stadium, Saturday, July 16th, 7.10pm

Thrown-in versus West Coast

Nearly four years ago, the Saints were in form after a slow start to the season and faced the surging Eagles at Docklands to keep their slim finals hopes alive.

Three finals campaigns over the previous three seasons had failed to yield a premiership which, in a rare state of affairs, was an expectation of the star-laden side from Moorabbin. The 2007 charge had many expecting the Saints to be capable of damaging things in September, should they sneak into the eight.

A first quarter of fast and furious football, with brilliant pressure in the forward half particularly, had Saints fans giving their side a standing ovation at the first change, with the home team up 5.5 (35) to the shellshocked Eagles’ 1.1 (7).

History would show the Eagles’ dangerous midfield of Cousins, Priddis and Cox – Judd was restricted with injury and Kerr was missing – settle and take control in the second half and overwhelm the Saints, who had lost promising tagger Jayden Attard to a season-ending knee injury.

Kosi’s third goal with just over 20 seconds remaining would bring St Kilda within two points, but the resulting ball to be won saw the Eagles go harder when it counted and seal the game with a quick major of their own.

From then on, the Saints would have to rely on Collingwood to defeat Adelaide the following Friday night, and beat the lowly Tigers themselves the day after to finish in the top eight. The Crows would get up, however, and St Kilda’s tight win was irrelevant.

Fast forward to three-quarter time last night, and a near-repeat of what transpired late in 2007 was well and truly in motion. For a team who is perennially taunted and teased by history, this looked sure to be added to the growing story of St Kilda’s heartbreak.

The Saints went into quarter-time with a 37-1 lead, led by Joey Montagna with an incredible 17 touches. Though he seemed to be roaming around on his own, he found the ball at will and his possessions were quality, with his pass setting up Milne for the first goal of the game (insert betting-related joke here) establishing the tone.

It was the relentless forward pressure that had the competition’s form side on the ropes so early. With the passing of Allan Jeans during the week, every player started looking to do justice to his legacy; Steven and Clarke punctuating the good work of Joey, McEvoy, Jones, Goddard, Dal, et al. with exciting finishes.

Late inclusion Kosi chimed in with two goals of his own, and when Vegas mopped up Roo’s second set-shot mess it was confirmed that the Saints could do no wrong, unless Roo was going to be having another set shot any time soon.

Vegas kicked his second soon after the break, and it seemed the flow of the game was unchanged. Milne nearly made it eight for the Saints but the ball slipped through his hands with nothing but several metres of empty space between him and the goals.

From then on, the Eagles slowed the Saints down and began to execute their forward press with much more authority. The influence of Priddis, Shuey, Nic Nat and Cox began to grow, their pressure had lifted as they went more tightly man-on-man and by half-time had kicked four of the next five goals.

BJ was getting frustrated, and it filtered through the rest of the side as the Saints had a hell of a time getting it out of the Eagles’ attack. When they did, the run and use of the corridor was stuttered and they began the old, silly habit of bombing it into the forward line.

It’s been this side’s undoing so many times recently, in much bigger games. West Coast knew exactly what was going to happen and were able to get numbers back, clean up any spills and send it back forward. The shared load the Saints carried going forward in the opening blitz morphed into lame predictability.

The third quarter saw the trend continue, and the Saints’ members were well and truly quelled. Youngster Andrew Gaff was superbly impressive through the game, and gave the Saints some more to think about. He finished with 21 touches and two goals, and his deft snap to set up another Eagles goal in the third term made the Saints look terribly lost.

Despite Dempster’s shutting down of a rejuvenated Andrew Embley, West Coast were all over the Saints. They had Eric MacKenzie blanketing Roo, and Nic Nat began making the hype real. He made contested marks look easy, cut through the midfield and took on Saints midfielders in an exciting run and dominated the ruck contests.

West Coast swallowed every meek foray the Saints made out defence, kicking long, high and wide for Nic Nat, Cox or Lynch to shut down any potential attack. If the ball spilled, the Eagles had numbers at the fall each time. They were working harder and looked like the team that Ross the Boss had described as a “locomotive” during the week.

Sadly, Jimmy Gwilt had his season ended by a rather innocuous shepherd in this term. Well and truly established as a member of the 22 over the past 18 months, his loss is the second of a senior St Kilda player this year after Lenny. Like Jack Steven was able to blossom in the latter’s absence, albeit with much more available time, the door may have opened now for Tom Simpkin or Tommy Walsh, both of whom Ross mentioned post-match. Blake and Baker are the more experienced options should the Saints not want to take chances as they vie for top-eight position.

The Eagles went into the final change in front, and it seemed the Saints’ hard work to create a 43-point lead would be frittered away, much as it had four years earlier.

St Kilda has experienced unthinkable situations on and off the field since that night in 2007. Ross has also been able to get his charges to switch between modes of play effectively, and they were able to respond to the gauntlet thrown down by the high-flying Eagles.

It started with Zac’s deadly delivery to a leading Milne early in the last. The Saints were already setting up as the had in the first term, allowing themselves to create and use space in the forward line. Milne went back and kicked the goal – his third – and the Saints were back in front.

Of course, the Eagles were too good to have it end there, and it was Nic Nat who freakishly roved his own ruck contest and snapped a goal on the run from a tight angle to put West Coast back in front.

For all his and Cox’s dominance in the ruck, however, the St Kilda midfield lifted in the last quarter and were pivotal in the Saints’ charge towards victory. Dal and Jones allowed the Saints to get the ball into the forward half and keep it in there, as Dempster and Polo locked down their opponents.

The Saints continued to play more direct football and getting to numbers to the ball. The game had changed again.

It was Dempster who rewarded the pressure further up the ground with a great snap from 45 metres out to give the Saints back the lead. Tellingly, he kicked the goal with the forward line full of space after the Saints had hounded the ball back from their opponents.

With just under five minutes to go, Joey was the fitting recipient of an errant MacKenzie kick deep in the pocket; like Dempster, he was able to cap off his own great game with an important goal when the match was there to be won.

A massively important centre clearance was won by the Saints, and the West Coast defenders were under pressure yet again. Joey broke through traffic and the ball found Brett Peake, who sidestepped his way to the sealing goal. Just like that.

Joey finished with with 34 disposals and a brilliant goal, Milne with three goals and plenty of help elsewhere, including setting up Armitage for the last goal of the match after another EMac howler. Goddard and Dal Santo were back to their damaging best, with plenty of help from Jones, Peake, Raph, Dempster, and a great last quarter from Gilbert off half-back.

Ross said after the game he’d played footage of Jeans to the Saints players pre-game – “not to be motivational but we’ve got some young players, so it was a reminder of his contribution to the club” – and described him as “the greatest leader in St Kilda’s history”. It was a fitting tribute from the players and coach alike.

This was the kind of fighting, weight-of-numbers performance that has punctuated St Kilda’s style over the past two years, and they’ll need to keep things moving as the race for the eight heats up. The Saints will go in favourites against the Crows and Suns over the next two weeks, but there is little room for error and more scoreless quarters.

Jeans is famously quoted as saying there are three states of play: “We have the ball, they have the ball, or the ball is in dispute.” As far as St Kilda’s 2011 season is concerned, the Saints have the ball. From now, it’s up to them to use it to their advantage.

Saturday night fever (the bad kind)

Another week, another must-win game for the Saints.

It’s a familiar scenario, as seasons 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and, at stages, 2010 saw the Saints battling in the latter part of the year after slow starts or troubled early periods.

Those seasons obviously offered a wide variety of results, and sadly 2011 is set to be one of the leaner ones. With the competition’s in-form team/locomotive in West Coast coming over this week, there are echoes of the failed Docklands battles in Round 18, 2006 and Round 21, 2007 which played huge parts in snuffing out the Saints’ wilder hopes.

This week is a good chance to follow suit.

Of course, there’s St Kilda’s incredible record at Docklands on Saturday nights to humour ourselves with – undefeated at the place and time since Round 9 of 2003.

That night, Collingwood was playing with its ailing legend, former player and coach Bob Rose in mind. This week, the Saints will wear black armbands for the departed Allan Jeans, and they’ll need to channel Yabby’s wisdom and fire to get over the line.

West Coast’s rise has been driven by a healthy mix of experienced heroes from the mid-aughts, and younger players coming into their prime. Cox, Embley and a rejuvenated Kerr – who is doubtful for this clash – have been joined by Priddis, Shuey, Rosa and Hurn on the Eagles’ frontline, and that’s before mentioning hype-machine Nic Nat.

Talls Kennedy and Lynch have been dangerous up forward, and they have LeCras and Nicoski buzzing around them. The former pair have formed a dangerous rotating attack of bigger bodies with Cox and Nic Nat, and the Saints will be stretched – nearly literally – to combat them.

Winning form is good form, and the Saints will be tempted to keep their line-up settled after last week’s big win (margin-wise, and that’s about it) against Port.

Lynch will probably come out for Kosi, who will return from suspension, otherwise Clarke may be the only other in danger of being dropped. Assuming height is the name of the game, Blake had a strong defensive performance in Sandringham’s woeful and unfortunately televised loss on Saturday, and would probably get the nod ahead of Walsh and Simpkin if there’s another change to be made.

Anything else would just be tinkering, and there won’t be much time for the Saints to do that once the ball is bounced on Saturday night. It won’t matter where they’re playing.

St Kilda and Fremantle: The Bizarre Rivalry

Edit: This post has had an “update” with a couple of additional minutiae, in Grand Final Week of 2013, here.

St Kilda and Fremantle share one of the most bizarre “rivalries” in the AFL.

As the two least successful clubs in VFL/AFL history to date, it’s not all-important clashes between competition juggernauts that this rivalry has been based on.

Rather, it has been a mixture of the unique, incredible and questionable, with occasional flashes of both genuinely brilliant and sadly woeful football being played.

It began immediately – although inconspicuously – in 1995, when Fremantle played their debut AFL match in the Ansett Australia Cup against the Saints at East Fremantle Oval. Whilst the match itself was normal enough (St Kilda would win by 35 points), this would be the only time (to date) the Dockers would actually play in Fremantle in a competitive AFL match.

In Round 14 of the following season, St Kilda would break through for its first win at Subiaco, and in Western Australia – of course, against Fremantle – in a game which produced great goals from both sides.

The next clash between the two came on ANZAC Day of 1997, with Fremantle – in 10th place and the Saints in 16th – weathering a late St Kilda challenge to win by a straight kick. The return bout was played on a ridiculously blustery day at Waverley in Round 20 of that year, with Fremantle in 10th place (again) going into the match whilst St Kilda was second on percentage, on its way to a second minor premiership. The Saints that time won a scrappy game by 13 points after the Dockers got within a point in the final term.

St Kilda co-captain Stewart Loewe would be stretchered off in Round 9 of 1998 at the WACA after an awkward fall in which his head ended up making contact with his knee. Despite a thrilling running goal from ruckman Peter Everitt, the 4th-placed Saints were overrun by the 13th-placed Dockers in the final term.

After several years of minor quirks, things were about to get really weird.

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