Port Adelaide Posts

The Pressure

Round 20, 2017
St Kilda 3.2, 7.5, 10.7. 15.13 (103)
West Coast Eagles 3.5, 7.8, 10.10, 14.11 (95)
Crowd: 22,688 at Etihad Stadium, Sunday, August 7th at 1.10pm

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Filthy

On Sunday morning I sent out a text to our group chat on Messenger, asking if anyone was actually coming to the footy. I was a definite starter, but after what had happened the previous weekend I was expecting the afternoon to crescendo at smattered applause echoing throughout the Concrete Dome, as per our lowest depths of 2014 and 2015. After the ignominy of what had happened the previous Saturday night, I secretly hoped no-one was going to turn up.

Not even the mega-PR smackdown of announcing Roo’s retirement on the Monday was going to completely bring us supporters out of our daze and dishevelment, of the anger and humiliation flowing from the Port finish. This was before the last passage was played on loop across all footy talk shows during the week, combined with endless analysis (of which I tried my own amateur, 0 AFL games-played hand at). Regardless of how we lost, we lost, and it felt as though the season was over. The month-long farewell tour of My Favourite Hair in the AFL was set to be a string of feel-good, cash-cow Association Football Star Testimonials, featuring some veterans to remind us of the good old days (Joey, maybe Gilbert; Nathan Brown on the same team as a nice twist), and use it as an opportunity for the kids to get some game time (White, and pretty much almost everyone else).

The replaying of Roo’s better moments in his career on said shows – not least the incredible mark in Round 11 of 2004 against the Swans at the SCG – off the back of the Port Adelaide result seemed to compound the situation. The person who for all intents and purposes would be the one to lift up the St Kilda Football Club’s second premiership cup on Grand Final Day never quite would be; and we only have a short time to celebrate his longevity and somehow make all those better moments feel somewhat relevant and have currency for as long as we’re mathematically capable of a top eight finish.

Unless we pull off a premiership that would be more ridiculous and bemusing than fairytale, it’s only going to get sadder over the coming weeks. Perversely, there’s a slight chance that we might now know at the end of the Richmond match in Round 23 if it is indeed his last game, depending on West Coast’s fortunes and the outcome of their game against Adelaide, which finishes a little more than an hour after our own.

Sunday, 12.45pm – Life Choices Consideration

I felt like the past week had been an instructive one as a St Kilda supporter. As I walked up the steps at Bourke Street to hit the bridge I think for the first time I genuinely questioned why I was going to the footy to watch St Kilda play. It’s the closest I could have come to really empathise with people who just sometimes can’t be fucked going to watch this club. It wasn’t the biting breeze and the rain falling at an increasing angle – I was about to going inside to the artificially heated set of a TV program anyway. I was still so furious about the week before. I’d been thinking about what long-term supporters have seen and experienced in return for those moments, that would make those kinds of demons go away. The answer is nothing if you’re about 55 years old or under, because even if you were alive at the time you sure as hell weren’t old enough to comprehend 1966, but you sure were able to take in 1971, 1997, 1998, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, etc. Those have been amongst our best years, and I doubt they make you feel purely warm and fuzzy thinking bank on them.

The anomaly of St Kilda, above its one premiership in 144 years, and its 27 bottom of the ladder finishes the VFL/AFL, is that it still survives. How much longer can that last? The Road to 2018 plan had 50,000 members in Australia and 10,000 in New Zealand. How much of our current financial shortfall is owing to those ridiculous overreaches? The lack of young player development this year has surely made further ill of the on-field elements. What if we’re garbage next year?

But a number of things happened between crossing that bridge (literally) and about 4pm that showed we’re might be at least reaching out a hand to the throat of some of those demons, whether they’re one week old or 51 years old. Hell, or 144 years old.

Conveniently, it was exactly those from the last 59 seconds of the previous weekend at the Adelaide Oval that we were placed in a position to exorcise (for now). This club likes to do things in extremes. Necessarily, it was players like Acres, Billings, Steele, Sinclair and Steven who played chief roles in casting them out; players that in varying degrees contributed to or represented a famous win being dissolved via scattered thoughts and barely a whimper.

Special Bulletin

It’s worth keeping in mind that the Port Adelaide result in isolation isn’t necessarily what will keep us out of the eight by season’s end. It certainly could on a micro level, and those four points are worth the exact same as valuable as any other four points. But think of how large our losses have typically been – of our nine losses, seven of them have been by 30, 38, 40, 57, 61 and 42 points. Our kicking at goal (in wins and losses) has seen 13.19, 14.23, 9.15, 19.16, 12.13, 12.17, 14.19, 12.17 again, 7.15 and 8.13. Our 21.12 against Richmond masked the fact the score was 92-10 at half-time, and that we didn’t even end up doubling their score – but Essendon more than doubled ours just one week later. The point being, not only have we blown games owing to poor kicking, but we’ve also sat our arses firmly on our percentage. Didn’t anyone remember how important that was last season? The club decided to extend the tease early on Sunday by posting shots of Bruce shitting out snaps from the pocket in the warm-up.

Things felt like they’d picked up where they’d fallen apart completely late the weekend before. Carlisle was back in the long sleeves – this time in home jumper, which again looked sensational – and was again a rock in defence. He didn’t quite have the same presence as last week but this game was played differently, and he still proved himself to be one of the better and more considered field kicks in the team. His bullet out of the goal square at full-back in the first quarter, after Roo did a reverse Roo in the first quarter, was so good it caught Dunstan unaware, and by the time the latter had realised he was running directly through the centre square with space in front of him the moment had got to him.

Up the other end, Whipping Human of the Week Blacres gave nothing away that he was about to put in one of his best performances in his short career. No presence in a one-on-one close to goal in the opening minutes and zero follow-up once the ball hit the deck, and then an ok aerial contest presenting near the 50-metre arc was backed up by a feeble tackle attempt.

His game started to building when he actually caught someone holding the footy, but a triple treat of slop in the shadows of three-quarter time him teetering on the edge of the Blacres that we all came to know so well with 19 seconds remaining against Port. Out on the rebound he managed to fumble the footy on his own, fumbled again at half-forward, only to, uh, fumble again at half-forward and a huge Roberton mark at centre half-back might have been the only thing between him and a plane ticket back to Perth with the Eagles that night.

For his occasional air-headedness, he really does change the game around when he’s switched on. He knows how to use his speed and size to open the field up and get some movement happening, and again he moved forward to good effect. It looked like the team was intent on making that a constant element of the game throughout the afternoon. As pissed off as I was with him and the team a few days ago, one week is a long time in footy. So is 19 seconds.

I didn’t give Acres nearly enough credit watching the game live. He was also responsible for a turnover in the second quarter that led to a Kennedy goal and put them out by 16 points. That would soon stretch further out to 22, and West Coast simply seemed to just have things working a little more smoothly. Mitchell was able to poke the ball forward off the ground out of the middle in traffic and whilst the ball ended up with Sheed out wider he still went back and kicked a huge goal from the meeting of the 50 arc and the boundary.

In a similar way the GWS win was engineered by a spread of players taking responsibility to step up at different times, Jack Sinclair took it on himself at with a string of clever and classy moments to steady things well before his good mate Jack would finish them off.

It began pretty simply – he worked his way to a dangerous spot in the goal square and was in the right place after consecutive efforts from Membrey and Billings to a long kick-in for the goal on the line. Again, he put himself in the right spot a couple of minutes later, sprinting past an aerial contest out wide on the 50, took the ball cleanly and cut in to spear the ball to Roo in front of goal. It was the kind of thing that we’ve seen barely enough of this year.

He’d then engineered a kick out of defence after Longer went down back and took a mark (seriously), that saw two big kicks across the ground in a bold switch that ended with Bruce hitting the post. That was made up for (sort of) by a smother and clever turn off of his opponent just on the 50 as the Eagles looked to rebound. Another neat kick to Roo probably should have been a free kick, but Billings reacted quickly at the fall and cannoned the footy out to Blacres closer to goal.

Sinclair isn’t necessarily the fastest player but he’s consistently proven this year to be agile, quick thinking and smart. Of course we need speed, but the mind needs to work pretty quickly in the moment too.

For all of Josh Bruce’s brave hard work the week before he again displayed some serious yips. The chain of long kicks that broke open the field and ended with his poster from a set shot deserved more, and whilst he did kick two his miss at the end could have become the stuff of St Kilda legend if we weren’t able to shut down the Eagles’ final switch into the middle. The way the crowd went up when he took the mark suggested we thought the game was done, which was dangerous to begin with even if he did kick it. But it set things up for Billings to step up in a big moment.

The Pressure

Someone once said to me, “All you want to see in sport is justice”. Jack Billings wasn’t nearly our best player last week, but he didn’t deserve to be the one with the best view of Robbie Gray’s kick other than Robbie Gray, and the one that replays will show he was the closest in his failed attempt to shut him down. So I don’t know if it’s quite justice that Billings was able to produce the two huge moments in the last quarter to go with and a handy game, but to St Kilda supporters I think it felt right. That he was so emotional when he kicked the sealer should say something to us about the pressure he must have felt in that moment, and how he must have felt every time he’d missed another shot at goal during the season. Before he decided to fly backwards in the goal square for the mark with in the last quarter, he’d kicked 17.28 for the season, including 0.2 so far that night, with another behind to come. Keep in mind 5.0 of that had been kicked on one day.

And this was exactly why we’d drafted him with pick 3. To back himself and take a huge contested mark when the game was on the line, and the be the one to react quickly and run at full tilt with one minute left to open up space and provide an option as soon the ball was turned over with two points separating the sides. And then, most importantly, kick the goal. Not just after the day he’d had in front of the sticks, but the year, and the pressure of almost four full seasons as he saw the player taken one pick after him rise and become a best and fairest winner in their club’s premiership year.

Billings on Sunday also did something we probably hadn’t seen him do before – an intercept on the wing, sprint, give-off and get back and a handsome delivery to Membrey on the lead.

For a game that was played at a pretty consistent tempo and featured 29 goals, individual moments still punctuated the contest. For the Saints, it was Roo’s confused shot running into goal that barrelled into Gresham, rather than put us up by nine points with momentum in the last quarter. Dunstan’s haphazard dribble kick attempt from the boundary early in the last ricocheted of an Eagle’s boot and went out on the full, and Dunstan again stepped up in front of goal in a big moment as had the week before. Roo gave up his game to force a one-on-one contest at a key moment late. Newnes and Bruce hit the post in the second quarter, and Gresham, Savage and Bruce all missed shots in 15 minutes between Steele putting us in front with a superb solo effort from a stoppage, and Kennedy setting up what we all feared we’d face all too soon after the previous week. For all the play we had in that final term, the 5.6 registered could have looked incredibly ugly.

Steele’s game overall was simply built on hard work and like Acres’ was arguably his best in his also brief career to date. Of his 26 possessions, 20 were contested but he showed off class to go with his strength, taking a strong contested mark and goaling on quarter time to go with his one-armed grab and goal in the last quarter.

The introduction of Steele and Koby Stevens has also allowed Dunstan to play less as a purely inside midfielder and it’s been to his benefit. It’s not purely the presence of Steele and Stevens doing, because Dunstan has had to improve and change his game in the same way that Seb Ross has been able to do (he’s not quite at Seb’s level yet, obviously). He’s also done it under the magnified pressure of having been dropped three times in the one year; he’d never been dropped from the team before this season. I thought he was our lead candidate for trade bait but he’s come back to be our best or in our best in his three games.

That we were down by 22 points during the second quarter and then 14 points in the last and able to win is something of great magnitude at this point in development. It said a lot about Richo and the coaches, their coaching, and the players that when faced with a nauseatingly similar, pressure-filled circumstance after last week – both within the game and within the season – that they were able to defend when they needed to, and continue attacking in those final moments when we still needed to score and really put the game away.

St Kilda History

When Robert Harvey announced his retirement ahead of Round 18 in 2008 the club was ninth, at the bottom of a logjam of teams separated only on percentage. A winning streak had been formulated in the previous weeks, and it was the springboard to honouring Harvey with a sensational top four finish, and a Preliminary Final appearance that gave us all a week to dream that Sir Robert might make another appearance on Grand Final Day.

Strangely, that Round 18 match was against Port Adelaide, the week after we’d lost to West Coast on the road. It also saw Harvey taken off after hit to the head – topically, his head hit the Docklands turf in a tackle, but he came back on – and we won by eight points with a scoreline of 101 to 93 in front of 22,878, as opposed to Sunday’s scoreline of 103 to 95 in front 22,688.

Going into early Sunday afternoon, we found ourselves in a vaguely similar but tougher situation with the ladder to that team of 2008. The dynamics of this team are obviously much different (I still think that if the players had got their heads around Ross’s style and plan a little quicker we might have been able to give 2008 a more serious shake – although at best that would basically have meant finishing second to Geelong on the ladder and hoping to ambush them on Grand Final Day a la Hawthorn). Roo’s announcement came less than 48 hours after Acres, Billy, Dunstan, et. al. combined for create one of the iconic moments of a truly amazing season (for the opposition), and I felt the combination of events shut down our season. As the weather warmed and made its first turns for spring earlier this week, and even on the colder days the sun shone a little longer in the late afternoon, it was that familiar feeling of the pending chance for some rest as others vied to write history.

There’s still next to no margin for error over the next few weeks, but how different we feel about this team. Ultimate redemption in football terms is something most of us – and after 51 years, all of us, really – are still searching for. But along the way you need to understand and deliver on the idea of redeeming yourself. As fans we’re obviously not the ones out there making the mistakes or kicking the clutch goals, but of course still feel them. We didn’t feel the effort or development last week, but on Sunday we would be able to feel that reward as players, coaches, and a club, and as members and supporters.

Sucked in

Round 19, 2017
Port Adelaide 2.3, 3.5, 5.7, 9.9 (63)
St Kilda 1.3, 2.8, 3.12, 8.13 (61)
Crowd: 30,335 at Adelaide Oval, Saturday, July 30th at 4.15pm CST

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When the three-quarter time siren sounded we’d kicked 2.12. Blacres, having had the wet weather show up any intent to play physically, had taken a contested mark. He kicked the goal and somehow it felt as though we were a chance of winning the game.

I wrote into my notes on the phone, “Acres on the siren wtf. Potential to be a curveball moment for the season.” He wasn’t the only one to be found wanting for presence at contests in the dour conditions, but twice in the final minute he would be on the wrong end of respective moments that crushed our season.

He also wasn’t the one to find themselves in moments that upended either their own good work or the hard work of everyone else. But St Kilda is about extremes and symbolic moments that ensure the heartbreak – no matter how good we are – outweighs the rarer better moments. A famous win in was shat on and decayed in seconds to an infamous, embarrassing loss.

It’s our turn as supporters for the football world and Nathan Brown with his Channel 9 big screen and David King with his Fox Footy graphics to ask “what the fucking fuck were you thinking?” to most of the players in the last 59 seconds. We all thought we were stupidly lucky when Jimmy Toumpas trailed Joey through the forward line in the last 25 seconds two years ago, and a bunch of people thought Richmond losing three games in a row earlier this year was funny, but now we’re the ones who have moved into membership destruction territory. So let’s get this over and done; let’s combine our zero games of experience, take an amateur look at things ourselves, and get really annoyed at some humans.

Richo said the coaches were happy with the set-up at the final stoppage. As the umpire throws the ball in, Acres is actually guarding in the space the Gray runs through just a couple of seconds later. Ryder and Longer are a very long way inboard for the throw in, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Ryder’s done that because he knows he can outpace Billy to the fall of the ball. Billy’s in defensive mode and will just want to follow him, and it opens up that space because Billy’s trailing Ryder, enough to not effect the ruck contest but too close to react to Ryder hitting back to where they were.

Seb was the one on Gray and is goalside of him at the mouth of the ruck contest. He’s immediately responsible for Gray and it’s on him to be able to nullify, you know, his own player. As an aside – Seb was one of our best, but was also the one who coughed up the ball straight to the Power up the other end before they came back for the Young goal, by kicking forward without looking, rather than handballing inside to Lonie who had plenty of space and runners around him.

Dunstan and Billings are on the other side of the contest, on Wines and Polec respectively. As the ball is in the air, Dunstan pushes Wines to get him off balance for the stoppage and make sure he stays goalside of him. Polec moves slightly inboard and Billings goes with with him to make sure he doesn’t get the kind of run Gray is about to enjoy.

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Gray knows exactly what Ryder is doing and runs around Ryder to the open space left by the movement of the rucks, and has gotten rid Seb in no time. Dunstan – also one of our best, and who put us in front in the last quarter – is caught ball watching and flat-footed, having just turned from Wines, and Gray runs right past him.

By the time Gray runs onto Ryder’s tap Acres has run, incredibly, bemusingly, to goalside of the mouth of where the ruck “contest” was two seconds earlier. Billings at least had to worry about leaving Polec and opening him up for a handball from Gray and an open chance, either at goal (he’s a long kick) or at least hitting someone up.

That’s why Billings was closest to Gray when Gray kicked the goal, not because he shirked anything. Billings was reacting to a) Longer not even getting to the fall of the ball; b) Seb not quite going with Gray; c) seeing that Acres had left the space open and; d) Dunstan ball-watching not moving. He was the only one who actually did react to Gray.

It’s worth pointing out Acres getting in sucked in to this contest as well his incredibly soft effort 40 seconds of play earlier that allowed Young’s goal. Carlisle didn’t quite make a contest at the fall of Geary’s spoil, which has probably the only thing he did wrong in a herculean performance in defence. Young came through to knock the ball as Westhoff and Acres were next in line. Westhoff reacted – let alone having the will at that point to bend over far enough and then quickly manoeuvre out of Acres’s awful attempt at a tackle – and gave off the handball to Young who finished neatly.

So this week Ryder and Gray enjoy another week in the spotlight thrown to them by the St Kilda Football Club. Last week it was Callum Sinclair breezing through the best game he’ll ever play. It’s a service we provide.

How much more do I have to pay for my fucking Ultimate social club membership for the players to get paid more than the literally hundreds of thousands of dollars they’re already paid to not create a huge space for arguably the best player in the competition to run through and kick a goal? Or to fucking kick straight? More terrifyingly, what if the club doesn’t owe me anything at all? At what point do they owe me anything if they ever do? How does someone who has followed the club for twice as long as I’ve been alive feel when they see this kind of thing?

 ***

Shout-out to the barracking of the Fox Footy commentary team, and also the lazy Fox Footy coverage in general – not one cut to St Kilda players after about 30 seconds following the siren. The emotion of these moments, games and results is just as much about the losers as it is the winners. That’s why the high of victory is what it is.

(Also whilst we’re doing shout-outs even though no-one reads this, shout-out to BigFooty user RWBlyf who’s taken licence with our moniker and Twitter profile image, and who’s posts on the forum almost certainly get a bigger readership than the rambling tripe I post on this.)

There’s a lot of hurt on different fronts. As frustrating as it is to think about that last play, it just fucking hurts to think about Membrey kicking that goal to put us up by 10 points and his reaction and the reaction of the players. They thought they had it won; we thought we had it won. Membrey was huge. Great contests in the front half, an ability to actually hold marks and fucking finish in front of goal, and in pressure situations. His game and his contribution deserved a much better result. In true St Kilda style, he was the one backing into the forward 50 entry that ended with Young’s goal, and his teammates made sure he was the one on the goal line who got to stretch, reach, strive in vain to get to Gray’s kick in the final seconds.

On a more macro perspective we’d pissed the game away a long time before that. We were 2.12 at the final change and simply not using the ball purposefully or effectively when we had it. We had so much of it, too. Richo didn’t trot out the “we’ll just keep practicing line” about the goalkicking. It’s cost us this season and right now it doesn’t fucking matter until March next year.

As good as Bruce was, he kicked 0.3. I feel bad for going near potting him, because his effort was hard to fault. You could give the bigger guys an out due to the weather, but how many of those marks that he dropped or goals that he missed would have turned out differently in dry conditions or under the roof? Richo went on the record earlier this year to say Bruce had been dropped because he wasn’t finishing – he wasn’t holding his marks and he wasn’t kicking the goals. He’s invented ways to miss goals in the last few weeks. I’m absolutely not saying he should be dropped. But at what point does it become a liability? If it is, how much of a liability is it? I still don’t think we can get a decent idea until we stop kicking high and long towards goal for no-one to be at the fall of the ball.

Billings shanked a couple for 0.2 and a host of other chances blah blah blah. He’s kicked 17.26 this year. The memory of Billings moving into something bordering on elite has already become a distant “What? Oh. Yeah.” I dunno. Sometimes it’s hard to keep giving a shit.

***

Obviously the nature of the result is cause to highlight this further; similar occurred in the West Coast loss in Round 2. We let four of their nine goals go through in the last 47 seconds of the first quarter and the last 59 seconds of the match. That’s either awful coaching or the players are lacking something severe – take your pick. But it’s a fucking problem.

How do we feel about Richo right now? I wasn’t sure about his public demeanour immediately after the game. I think he didn’t quite know what to do, so I fucking hope he gets it right. There’s four more games and then we’re in the season that the club publicly declared its intentions to be a top-four team by.

It’s easy and obvious to say this, but I didn’t think Richo was angry enough publicly. I understand the need to talk up effort blah blah blah, and early on in the press conference he pointed out that “when the game was at its most important” Port were able to get it done. In his members’ message video he said, “We had a good day at clearance against a very good clearance team.” Cool. He was afforded the same unchallenged comment in the press conference. He’s obviously on good terms with Michaelangelo Rucci following some time spent in a one-paper, two-team city, but when you’re as shitty as most of us would have been with the last two minutes. Effort and basic stuff like that are a given. Surely we’re at that point in our development by now?

Also mentioned in Richo’s video message – and absolutely not his fault, but he was nonetheless put in the place to be the one to apologise for it – was that the club had a “mix-up with time” and got out early to training, them “that meant some fans that had travelled a fair way missed out”. Great work.

The elimination of the Development League this week, and the Sandringham leadership group’s proposal to the board – not to mention Danny Corcoran’s comments – has the clock is ticking on the alignment lot closer to midnight. Playing without Montagna and Riewoldt, and to a lesser extent Gilbert and Armitage, obviously wasn’t a hindrance to giving a vague effort nor missing goals as we usually do. Given that we decided to kick our season away around the ground and in front of goal over a number of weeks, we’ve also in turn wasted a lot of time not putting game time into White and D-Mac, who were really competitive last night, Marshall, who only missed out because of some weather and will probably be shunted out next week; and maybe Ben Long. Mav came straight back into them and did fuck all for his 10 possessions. I’d forgotten that he’d played.

So we know now the club was just as seduced by the second half of last year as we the fans were. Given the type of week and weekend it’s been, it was nice of Sandy to replicate the seniors this afternoon and have posted 2.8 themselves after the entire first half of footy. But why can Port recruit someone like Powell-Pepper who’s not just barrelling through Newnes in his first season, but willing to do it, and we’ve got Acres, Sinclair, Lonie and Billings being thrown around like seagulls in a breeze? Dunstan’s great form over the two weeks, in response to being dropped yet again, has been lost amongst the poor results, sure. But I don’t think four or five games for Marshall, White and Long is worth a season of finishing 11th or 12th.

The Zebs don’t want to exist as several players topping up a St Kilda VFL team, which is fair enough because the AFL should have thought about destroying a league with an amazing history and its clubs for its own benefit. The $500,000 or so that it costs to run a standalone reserves team was meant to be going to the Moorabbin redevelopment and perhaps an AFLW team, and now we might have stalled our development because we got a little bit too excited. We’re literally not a club that can afford to do that kind of thing. Maybe if we kick straight the next time we’re playing in the 2009 Grand Final we might not have yet again found ourselves in a shitty situation like this.

***

If we’re good enough, then this coach and this team and this administration will take us to a much, much better situation – specifically, a second premiership – regardless of whether we won last night or not.

As members and supporters it hurts because there’s no instant payoff. We’re not privy to, nor to do we feel or take on any of the learning or development that the players get in the post-match review, nor do we know it even exists until we see it put into practice on game day. Furthermore, those lessons count for nothing if all this development business just ends up with no premiership and another rebuild. As fans we’re staring the down the barrel of a lifetime as St Kilda supporters, and moments like these feel awful because we pay for memberships, we take the time out to watch the game, or whatever, and we need to be reminded why we do that sometimes. Game day is where we get that pay-off, whether through effort, or through the result. Those things differ from week to week and year to year.

Amongst the slow burn over decades of heartbreak of following St Kilda, these are the moments when you really feel like you get your hands dirty as a supporter. This is not our time. That’s just part of our development, and all the draft picks and trades over the past few years weren’t about building towards last night. Ultimately, it shouldn’t depend on last night’s outcome. It’s an experience for the players, for the coaches, and us as well.

Jeeeeeeeeeeeez

Round 17, 2015
Port Adelaide 4.5, 8.5, 12.7, 17.10 (112)
St Kilda 1.4, 3.10, 4.12, 6.13 (49)
Crowd: 36,850 at Adelaide Oval, Sunday, August 2nd at 1.10pm (12.40pm CST)

There’s dog shit and there’s dog shit.

There’s the kind that we had to put up with during week in regards to Adam Goodes. People from Andrew Bolt, Rita Panahi and Shane Warne to Alan Jones and Grant Thomas and most people on Twitter and BigFooty not understanding the position of privilege they’re in, and the position they’re in of collectively totally not coming up with actual arguments that make genuine sense in regards to anything to do with the issue. Angry, helpless, mobilised, determined, confused, dismayed. There is no way to reason with these people and I can only assume Adam Goodes feels vaguely similar upon realising that attempts at education and reconciliation – and specifically his own, having dealt with racism his entire life – only infuriate and annoy these types of people. They apparently don’t want to deal with it in any way, lest something that so far remains undefined happens.

So we got to actual footy and there were some touching acts of solidarity, with Richmond and the Bulldogs wearing their indigenous jumpers and Melbourne wearing armbands in the colour of the indigenous flag. Zero points are awarded to the Collingwood clowns for booing Jeff Garlett’s celebration on Saturday afternoon.

That Sunday’s paper revealed St Kilda is planning on hosting the first Pride match next year should tell people some really, really good things are happening. The club has said it has received correspondence from people angry or dismayed at the idea. To those who had registered those complaints with the club: feel free to defend your free speech all you want, but free speech is designed to challenge ourselves and each other and weed out poison attitudes like that.

Then there’s what we witnessed on Sunday afternoon. This kind of dog shit is far more expected, tempered. The kind that isn’t as divisive as the very idea that some people live differently and look kinda different (which shouldn’t be divisive, but here we are). This is one that St Kilda supporters have taken ownership of over 142 years. It’s not race or culture politics in the widest sense, but still in a special way it forms a massive part of who we are.

On paper this was a match between two teams of inconsistency in 2015. Port has worn the tag in a higher class though, being the competition’s great disappointment. However, they still have a much higher ceiling than a number of opponents (especially us). This looks suspiciously like a Geelong 2006. Application aside, Polec probably robbed them of more movement that we gave him credit for and Paddy Ryder looks more like an asset that needs proper adjusting to rather than an instant booster. The way the game panned out, in isolation, would tell you what last year’s meeting said about both teams. One a youthful and exciting challenger, the other youthful and barely finding their feet.

The St Kilda social media team ripped up this marginally terrifying pop culture reference following last week’s Billy Longer star turn, although should Billy have a successful career in a – dare I say it – successful team that photo could by proxy become an iconic one for St Kilda supporters. Like most weeks, I’d have to say that after today I’m no closer to feeling confident one or way or the other.

Geary was the captain in Riewoldt’s absence, and this year hasn’t solved any questions about where he really sits in the side. Nathan Wright was listed on the extended bench, D-Mac came in and there’s still Acres, Saunders and Murdoch hanging around in be VFL. Now, obviously they’re not all the same type of player but you’d like to think anyone vaguely playing Geary’s role, or elements of them, would be a little more dynamic than he is. I know he’s incredibly respected by the everyone inside the club but it became quickly apparent that when it comes to who is naturally drawn to potential captains the contribution you make on the field can’t be ignored.

Whilst he got some “good” i.e. “relatively high” numbers (23 disposals was second behind only Joey for us) he offered the game some ripper clangers for someone supposedly meant to uphold the higher standards and set an example. His kick along the ground (unforced) at the back of the centre square as we were working to rebound turned into a cheap Port goal and highlighted just what kind of a clown he can be with the ball in hand.

Port’s good movement and our lack thereof mad us look incredibly confused at times. Whilst it’s the done thing obviously to rotate your direct opponent this was hamster wheel stuff and was obviously working in Port’s favour. Never should Jarryn Geary be having to take a one on one Schulz – Goddard was trailing by a metre to make the extra man completely useless – let alone Westhoff shortly following. Moments after those contests Schulz had found another undersized opponent in Sav and then Westhoff was magically with Roberton.

The pressure was thereabouts but needed to be wiser. Sav and Roberton left but both of their men on the wing when it looked like Port were about to be trapped, but they easily opened it up for them and Moore ended up with a shot on goal.

Josh Bruce comically kept his goal-in-every-game record for 2015 in tact after a lovely set shot after the siren. It was probably the most nervously he’d looked all season, particularly given his performance itself could be described as comical.

His work in contests was more Billy Longer than Josh Bruce this year, and whilst the ball use was absolute slop he often found himself nowhere near the drop of the ball, otherwise the ball would be hurtling through his hands when he did. A great contested mark in the third quarter was rewarded with a behind from what has been a forte of his this year – the left-foot banana set shot from the pocket. Suffice to say he didn’t really have any fortes coming into this season, let alone having that good a year that we’re getting that specific.

His worst game for the year peaked clearly with the mark and goal, but it was summed up best by Paddy’s first cracking of the shits. We were privileged enough to witness Hugh’s the other week, but his was more of “the first of many, awwww”. Paddy’s said as much about his own leadership and application (even at this early stage) as it did how badly Josh was playing. Paddy had set himself for the fall of another woeful forward-50 entry and Josh just casually walked into his path, which is something I still expect Josh Bruce to more likely of doing rather than playing quality Australian Rules football. Like, he just literally walked into his way.

Paddy registered some low numbers but he took a couple of really good, strong marks and was unlucky to not return better than 2.0. For a guy who looks like he’s had minus-one pre-seasons he moves very well, whether it’s to work off his man and get to the fall of the ball or work up the ground. Not sure still where Membrey fits into this forward line at this early stage in all their careers – let the record show that going into this game we Paddy (four games), Bruce, Membrey and Hickey as our tall forwards to go with Sinclair and Eli as the smalls – but with Riewoldt coming back in I just can’t take Paddy out. Membrey would be hard done by after coming in for a quarter of the worst team game for three months, and Hickey unfortunately might need to rely on Billy to have been hit hard enough that he takes a rest next week. He might be firming a little as trade bait but I hope not. More Quick 60 please.

Whilst you couldn’t fault the small forwards for the entry, they were absolutely nowhere near it when the ball hit the deck. Eli’s game, like his hair, is now devoid of flash and DARE® Iced Coffee. No speed, no presence; I’m not actually sure what he does. Surely Lonie comes straight back in. Sinclair had good moments and Mav was really good again (despite missing the sitter after the solo effort), but going on this performance the forward line is infinitely more lively with Lonie and Billings in their (the latter obviously won’t be until next year).

Joey chipped in with a couple of goals and what should have been a third from a relatively easy set shot. This year he seems to have a lot more nous in his positioning in the forward line, and in the process might extend his career by a year or two if he maintains it. The thing is, we’re going to need him in the middle a lot more over the next couple of years if we don’t recruit or draft a decent mid, which we’re going to have to do anyway whether it’s the road to 2018 or 2050.

Because it wasn’t necessarily that we got smashed out of the middle. The two teams split the inside-50’s 52-apiece, it was that the quality of the ball use was far better than the current ladder placing going in the match suggested, and we demonstrated an irresistible combination of being out-pressured and driven to hurried disposal by Port when we had the ball and shanking our kicks when we were on our own anyway.

It was looking dangerous from the start. Big names Ryder, Wingard and Westhoff all had shots early, and Sinclair and Dunstan were using their time and space in our forward 50 to miss.

The midfield “battle” looked like it might have been evened up a little when Wines went off with his shoulder out but the Power had us covered for intent and talent anyway. Apart from Paddy’s workrate there was little to get excited about in the first quarter asides from so good work by Hickey low and Billy working really hard to get his hand to a Schulz kick on the goal line.

In another year of not a massive amount of individual highlights (granted, there’s been far more this year than the last two combined) Mav staked his claim for point of the year both commendably and infuriatingly. I’m referring to the aforementioned effort in which his endeavour, as we’ve come to expect, couldn’t be questioned but he managed to kick from the 15 metres out across the entirety of the open goalmouth.

It was the start of an incredibly frustrating quarter which netted 2.6 whilst the Power kicked 4.0 from half as many scoring shots. Highlights included Armo’s weird attempt at drawing the opposition at the back of the centre square to handball of the top and Neade ran off with it for a goal, and then Roberton’s to ridiculous short kicks to the respective pockets out of the goalsquare with an already-trademark Hugh Goddard one-two as an interlude. The second kick simply went out of bounds to finish off the big contested intercept mark Hugh took at full-back in the first place.

Bruce by this point had been suspiciously quiet and when he finally pushed up into the middle and found space he took the mark, turned around and his kick – which we can only assume was meant for Paddy – ended up near zero humans and out of bounds. Paddy eventually got onto the end of one on the opposite side and took a great mark with his opponent right on him, but he missed.

It was apparent that for yet another week our strategy going into attack seemed to be to just drop the ball from on high onto a bunch of people vaguely near goal. One contest featured all of Bruce, McCartin and Hickey, which would tell there aren’t many big guys leading into any space – or any space any of them to lead into to begin with, take your pick – and of all people Hickey took the grab (he missed the goal). Later in the term Armo had the footy going forward and established that an Eli one-on-one short and 45 metres out was the best option. Whichever way you look at it there’s something wrong with that scenario, and so it was for the entire day.

The half – and probably the day – was summed up around this point when Roberton left his man one-on-one 20 metres out to knock forward the footy to Dunstan who was closing in on the contest. Roberton got to the ball OK but didn’t bother with the shepherd, and Dunstan only needed to be a little untidy before he was swamped by the Power and White snapped a goal. Fair to say it wasn’t Roberton’s best quarter, and we can only hope we can say it’s his worst from here because he’s done some good things year. But fark he looks casual doing anything.

This was quickly followed Weller literally handballing it straight to a Port player after getting the ball from Newnes, and Newnes should have kicked it forward as it was.

It’s probably fair to say the only guys that played a consistently good game was Sean Dempster. Easy to malign him over the last couple of years when our defence was constantly being deserted by the mids and he was forced to play one-on-one on key forwards who had decent delivery on tap, but he’s done so much right this year. Yesterday he had to do it all and held up his end; whether close to Port’s goal or pressing up to help out he effected spoils, took some strong marks and his made some invaluable contested efforts on the whole.

We know far too well that it’s inevitable we’re going to get days like this. The more remarkable days in these times are almost always punctuated by a kid or few playing a game that gives us optimism when going to footy is an exercise in nothing much beyond pessimism.

But some days those kids just aren’t going to fire a shot, and we’re left with a game that after time we will barely remember. You can’t pre-empt those but in hindsight you wonder if they were worth it at all. Even drilling down to mundane you try and think of something – a good hit-out against an exciting team, a chance for Paddy, Hugh et al to experience travel, and so on – that makes it feel like it was worth it. We won’t really know that either for a long time.

Ah yes, the old “Top team at their home ground interstate and you’re rubbish” game

Well, only a few weeks ago commentators and so on were herald the Saints as this year’s Port Adelaide.

Obviously they’re wrong, and we’ll get to see just how wrong today when a rejuvenated Port Adelaide Football Club sets out to stay on top of the AFL ladder, as well as showcase its new home ground, the current darling stadium of the league.

The way Port Adelaide play their footy means that if they’re switched on then the margin of this one might well reach triple figures. They’ve taken out captain Boak and Matthew White, but the Pies could afford to rest Dane Swan and Brodie Grundy for us and they still won by 86 points.

Even then, the Saints still managed to string a few minutes at a time of decent footy, although for the most part we’re still looking for glimpses or good games from individuals more than anything. It’s a real shame My Favourite Player Arryn Siposs was dropped; I actually thought he’d really improved his work rate last Friday and had done enough for another chance. Big Rhys Bandwagon’s been steered into the VISY Park driveway for a bit to take on Chris Judd himself, and I guess it was time. I was apprehensive about it because I didn’t think the alternative was quite ready, but both BIG TOMMY LEE and Sam Dunell (slightly less fanfare) are coming in to keep things stable in the front half and apparently keep the pressure up.

Dunell seems to have earned senior selection ahead of a couple of others on VFL form this year and I hope he takes his chance. The back end of 2012 saw him get a few games and whilst his numbers weren’t astronomical he did show some real poise and mobility. Last year he and the whole club went a little AWOL so let’s see what he’s got for us this time.

As for Tommy Lee, I think you can bank him leading to all the right spots, it’s just if he’ll hold them regularly enough (certainly in his first game back at the top level) and what he’ll do following up the contest with or without the ball. Yes, yes, we’ve all talked about (and for most of us, got it wrong) what we traded for, but pick 12 is something you don’t just wave around, even if it’s part of a package. And come back to me when Spencer White looks like he’ll be playing senior footy any time soon (yes, he’s been injured but where was he going before that?). But that said, I really like Big Tommy Lee. He’s only played a few AFL games too at the end of the day and if he ends up playing every game until the end of the season that would be huge. He might have to play relief ruck on occasion too, perhaps with Josh Bruce, so he’ll earn some coach’s points if he can hold is on there too.

So, RIP Favourite Hair-Bandwagon Forward Set-Up for now. Is there a perfect world in which My Favourite Hair, Lee, Rhys and Sippa can all co-exist? Dunell I’m not too fussed. For now, anyway. Regardless, none of those Non-Favourite Hair options are a suitable replacement for My Favourite Hair, but they’re gonna have to start getting their shit together because  the post-Favourite Hair world is coming.

Not sure if anyone’s had the chance to check but by last dollar is on My Favourite Hair looking pretty happy over the last day or two because his Favourite Goal Celebration Partner Josh Saunders is back into the team. It will create a really interesting dynamic immediately post-goal too (on the rare occasion there actually is one), with Roo and Saunders having the inherent attraction towards each other but Big Tommy Lee in and keen on getting right up into the goalkicker’s grill ASAP for the first high-five.

Head Simpkin is in, too. That’s different.

It looks like Tom Curren has lost out in the “Other” midfielders’ category, and Armo didn’t even need to come back in. He’s been taken over as the emergency…emergency though and the way Richo’s alluded to it this week there’s a sneaky chance he might come in. CJ surely won’t be sub a second time around and Mav Weller surely gets a full game after literally five seconds last week, so perhaps Saunders gets the green vest and a chance to ease his way back in.

Maybe Jack Billings? You’d almost say he’s due for a rest, but with Schneider out with an infection he almost becomes quite necessary across half-forward, and his class is obviously above that of Saunders’. Who knows? He might be the one to come out for Curren. Milera back in the team might smooth over that a little, and it won’t be Brodie.

Ahhh, so, Saturday twilight. It’s not terrible but it’s not one of the good ones. Perhaps all the better for no-one to see us with, because this could get all kinds of ugly.

My prediction: Port Adelaide by billions.

St Kilda and Fremantle: The Bizarro Rivalry (update)

The Ross Lyon defection brokered a new sensational chapter in the ridiculous rivalry between St Kilda and Fremantle, which I’d written on in 2010.

Whilst Ross took things to a new level, this past weekend threw up a couple more very interesting links:
– St Kilda’s first Grand Final appearance was in 1913, against Fitzroy. Freo will make their first Grand Final appearance 100 years later.
– Freo’s strange decision to wear their clash jumper on Saturday makes them just the second club to do so in a Grand Final. The first team to wear a clash jumper in Grand Final was St Kilda – also under Ross – in 2010.

Here’s the original post, “St Kilda and Fremantle: The Bizarre Rivalry” (I’m not sure why I didn’t take the golden opportunity to throw in the Seinfeld reference then and there) from 2010:

St Kilda and Fremantle share one of the most bizarre “rivalries” in the AFL.

As the two least successful clubs in VFL/AFL history to date, it’s not all-important clashes between competition juggernauts that this rivalry has been based on.

Rather, it has been a mixture of the unique, incredible and questionable, with occasional flashes of both genuinely brilliant and sadly woeful football being played.

It began immediately – although inconspicuously – in 1995, when Fremantle played their debut AFL match in the Ansett Australia Cup against the Saints at East Fremantle Oval. Whilst the match itself was normal enough (St Kilda would win by 35 points), this would be the only time (to date) the Dockers would actually play in Fremantle in a competitive AFL match.

In Round 14 of the following season, St Kilda would break through for its first win at Subiaco, and in Western Australia – of course, against Fremantle – in a game which produced great goals from both sides.

The next clash between the two came on ANZAC Day of 1997, with Fremantle – in 10th place and the Saints in 16th – weathering a late St Kilda challenge to win by a straight kick. The return bout was played on a ridiculously blustery day at Waverley in Round 20 of that year, with Fremantle in 10th place (again) going into the match whilst St Kilda was second on percentage, on its way to a second minor premiership. The Saints that time won a scrappy game by 13 points after the Dockers got within a point in the final term.

St Kilda co-captain Stewart Loewe would be stretchered off in Round 9 of 1998 at the WACA after an awkward fall in which his head ended up making contact with his knee. Despite a thrilling running goal from ruckman Peter Everitt, the 4th-placed Saints were overrun by the 13th-placed Dockers in the final term.

After several years of minor quirks, things were about to get really weird.

Continue readingRound 15 of 1999 will be remembered for the mark that was taken by umpire Peter Carey. Early in the match, Docker (and former Saint) Adrian Fletcher centred a short pass to Brad Wira on the wing, only for the experienced Carey, who was in the path of the ball’s trajectory, to take the mark and call for a ball-up. Needless to say, the incident was a massive talking point in football circles, though ultimately it would take its place in VFL/AFL history as a wonderfully unique and humourous moment in a game that has a habit of throwing those up from time to time. The Dockers would go on to win the game by 23 points, and send St Kilda’s season into a further downward spiral.

By the time the two teams met in Round 12 of 2001, both teams had new coaches and were sharing 14th (St Kilda) and 16th (Fremantle) places on the ladder; by season’s end they would be 15th and 16th respectively. On this Saturday night at Subiaco, the Saints won their third game of the year after a young Stephen Milne sprang to life in the final term, on his way to kicking three goals and giving the Saints a 10-point win. However, captain Robert Harvey would seriously injure his knee in a gang tackle that continued well past its use-by date; with the ball locked up amongst the scrum, the umpire inexplicably chose to let play continue, long enough for the Dockers players to force Harvey to the turf as his knee buckled under him.

It would also be Malcolm Blight’s last victory as coach for the Saints, with his brief tenure at Moorabbin ending just three weeks later.

The next season threw up a couple more notable matches – in Round 2, the fast-finishing Dockers would roll the Saints by three points at home after trailing for much of the day, and in Round 17 St Kilda played a rare home match at Princes Park and defeat the Dockers in a dead-rubber in front of just 8,078 fans.

A skip to 2004 would find Brent Guerra breaking Docker Byran Schammer’s arm in a devastating bump as a barnstorming St Kilda extended their winning streak to seven to begin the season, as well as Fremantle wearing their predominantly white away/clash jumper for the first time in the return match in Round 22 at Docklands.

A trio of thrilling matches followed. Strange, thrilling matches.

In round 2 of 2005, St Kilda won their first match of the season by a solitary point at York Park in Tasmania. The Saints would overhaul the Dockers in trying conditions, with Aaron Hamill earning a free kick for holding the ball and scoring the winning point – but not before a final Fremantle charge into their forward line, with defender Luke Penny expertly safely punching the ball out of bounds in the final seconds from a marking contest.

The infamous “Whispers in the Sky” clash was a dire battle in Round 21 at Subiaco. St Kilda were pushing to solidify a top four spot after being outside of the 8 after Round 13, though tipped by many to win the premiership on the eve of the season. Skipper Nick Riewoldt has broken his collarbone in Round 14, and stand-in captain Justin Koschitzke had powered his way to stunning form and lead the Saints’ fight for redemption. He earned 11 Brownlow votes in just five matches, and with Riewoldt back, he was seen as a key component to St Kilda’s premiership hopes as September neared. Fremantle, meanwhile were hoping to return to finals action after St Kilda had knocked them out on the eve of the 2004 finals series.

What happened on that Friday night is now a part of St Kilda-Fremantle rivalry folklore. Awful and questionable umpiring decisions went Fremantle’s way all night, gifting the Dockers several goals and depriving the Saints of several chances of their own. Koschitzke would injure a quad muscle in the third quarter, and he would not be fit enough to return to the side, which bowed out in the preliminary final several weeks later (had St Kilda defeated Sydney in that match, he would have been a huge chance to return for the Grand Final).

The final term was an old-fashioned thriller. In the final minute, with the Saints up by a point, Justin Peckett was run down by Luke McPharlin just outside Fremantle’s 50-metre arc; the resulting kick forward saw Justin Longmuir take a spectacular mark over the top of the pack just 25 metres out from goal. His kick was straight, and the Dockers had won by five points, and were to face reigning premier Port Adelaide the following week in the final round for a spot in the finals.

Channel Nine reporter Tony Jones – travelling back to Melbourne from the game after Nine’s coverage – claimed that he heard umpire Matthew Head, who had made a number of the decisions that went Fremantle’s way remark, “Now I know what it feels like to have a victory”. Several other passengers made the same claim as Jones, but the AFL cleared Head of any wrongdoing after an investigation into the matter that week.

Though they would start strongly, Fremantle lost to Port Adelaide the following week and finish 10th as the Power clinched eighth spot. St Kilda would go on to record two amazing victories over the following two weeks – their biggest win in the club’s 132-year history over the Brisbane Lions, by 139 points, and a brave eight-point win over minor premiers Adelaide in the First Qualifying Final at AAMI Stadium, to secure a home Preliminary Final and a week’s rest.

But the centrepiece of this rivalry – so far, at least – came in Round 5, 2006; the final installment of this trilogy taking place where it started – at York Park (now Aurora Stadium) in Tasmania, referred to as “Sirengate”.

The Dockers were truly dangerous in 2006, and were only knocked out a week short of the Grand Final. Though notorious for poor interstate form, on this day they were all over an inept St Kilda, who were making another slow start to a season. Though the Saints would be in with a chance all day, that chance seemed to have disappeared as the clock counted down to zero as a desperate Dockers defence forced a stopped in the Saints forward line, with their team up by a point. The siren sounded, and Fremantle players around the ball began celebrating a hard-fought victory.

But the siren was quite faint, and umpire didn’t hear it – and play continued from the stoppage well after full-time. The Saints forced the ball to Steven Baker, whose flying shot at goal – a number of seconds after the siren – missed to the left, tying the scores. The umpire then awarded Baker a free kick for a hit he got as he kicked it, and so he was to take the kick again, with the first behind taken back, and the Saints again down by a point. As this was occurring, Fremantle officials had stormed on to the ground to remonstrate with the umpires, with coach Chris Connolly finding himself arguing with St Kilda player Lenny Hayes. Verbal stoushes were springing up between officials, umpires and players left, right and centre, and amongst it all, Baker missed again. The game was a draw.

St Kilda coach Grant Thomas declared the game “one for the blooper reel” in the post-match wash-up, whilst Connolly was understandably furious. Fremantle immediately took the issue to the AFL. Sensationally, the AFL overturned the result during the week, with final score officially at 13.15 (93) to 14.10 (94), the Dockers victorious by a point.

The sides would meet again at Subiaco in Round 20. To date, this match is the most important game the clubs have been involved in against each other, with a top four spot up for grabs. Fremantle trounced the Saints, with the only highlight for St Kilda being a goal kicked by Brendon Goddard from an enormous kick late in the match; from just inside the centre square, Goddard’s kick would go through the goals at post-height.

The Dockers would finish third on the ladder, with fellow Subiaco tenants West Coast in first place. Though they would lose the Second Qualifying Final to Adelaide away, they won their first final of any sort at home against Melbourne a week later. Sydney knocked them out a week later, otherwise the MCG would have been set for an all-Western Australian Grand Final.

Several things of note come out of this. Firstly, St Kilda would have finished third on superior percentage if the “Sirengate” result had stood, forcing eventual Grand Finalists Sydney out of the top four, and forcing a Western Derby as a First Qualifying Final. Instead, the Saints finished sixth and limped out of the finals series in the first week, losing to Melbourne in the Second Elimination Final. Of course, if the Saints had won that game – which was a good chance of happening through the final term – they would have faced Fremantle in a semi-final, bringing the two teams face-to-face in massive game; as it happened, Grant Thomas would be sacked just days after the loss to the Demons. The other point worth considering – albeit a hypothetical one – is if the AFL would have overturned the result the way it did had Baker actually kicked a goal from either of his shots, “winning” the game for St Kilda. It’s one thing to overturn a draw, but to  completely reverse the outcome of a match would have made this issue far, far greater, and a much more daunting prospect for the AFL.

The following season was a disappointment for both teams. When they squared off in Round 20, with the Saints hoping to snatch a finals spot under new coach Ross Lyon, a collision between Steven Baker and Jeff Farmer would be the talking point of the competition for the following week.

Farmer left the ground concussed, with blood pouring from his face, after evidently running into the back of Baker. No umpires nor cameras saw or captured the incident, but a Fremantle trainer said that Baker had been malicious in the collision, and this was influential in the seven-match suspension Baker received. The Saints appealed, but this fell on deaf ears from the AFL. The decision would prove costly for the Saints, who were now without their star tagger as they were coming up against West Coast the following week, a must-win game for the Saints. The Eagles’ midfield of Chris Judd, Ben Cousins and Daniel Kerr were able to run far more freely and eventually the Eagles would win by eight points; though St Kilda defeated Richmond in Round 22, they would finish the season in ninth position after Adelaide also won their final round match to knock St Kilda out of September calculations.

Round 13 of 2008 saw a spluttering Saints wielding the axe on senior players Nick Dal Santo and Stephen Milne after just three wins from the previous ten games of football. Ben McEvoy, Robert Eddy and Jarryd Allen would all debut for the Saints on a dogged Friday night, with the Saints prevailing by eight points. It would be the beginning of a remarkable turnaround for Ross Lyon and his men, who would win eight of their final ten matches in the home-and-away season to finish fourth, including the return game at Subiaco in Round 20 which Stephen Milne played out with a grotesquely swollen cheek. The Saints would fall one week short of the Grand Final.

The Saints would go one better in 2009, as Fremantle were again finding themselves at the wrong end of the ladder. In Round 4, the Saints crushed the Dockers by 88 points, and keeping the visitors to a scoreline of 4.4 (28), the joint-lowest score at Docklands. Of course, that record is shared with St Kilda, who could only manage 3.10 (28) against Collingwood in Round 6 of 2002.

Most recently, their 2010 NAB Cup semi-final match was nearly called off, after storms ravaged the Melbourne CBD, leaving Etihad Stadium with internal roofing damage. The players ran out for a later start to no crowd in attendance, and the 5,000+ fans were eventually let in over the first quarter, but only allowed to be seated on the bottom level. St Kilda would win a position in the Final easily, but would lose that to the Western Bulldogs, who were making their first Final appearance of any kind in 40 years.

And now on Sunday evening, the two teams will be squaring off, and coming into this round are occupying the top two positions on the ladder. It’s definitely the first time this has happened with these two clubs; Fremantle will be looking to be on top of the AFL ladder at the completion of any round for the first time in their history, whilst the Saints are going to be entering a lengthy period of time with injured captain Nick Riewoldt. The football world will be watching this intriguing clash, which will hopefully be remembered for some good football, promising individual performances and solid teamwork. As long as no umpires take marks or feel like “having a victory”, or the siren fails, or there are unseen and inconclusive clashes which result in massive suspensions, or storms unleash fury over Melbourne, then there’s a good chance that just might happen.

But who knows?

Links

Umpire Peter Carey takes a mark in Round 15, 1999

Justin Longmuir kicks a goal after the siren to win the game for the Dockers in the “Whispers in the Sky” match, in Round 20, 2005

“Sirengate” finish Part 1, Round 5, 2006

“Sirengate” finish Part 2

Brendon Goddard’s monster goal, Round 20, 2006